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The Evolving Developer Advocate Role — A Conversation with Google’s Kim Bannerman

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At this year’s Cloud Foundry Summit Europe, the story was about developers as the heroes. They’re the ones who make the platforms. They are akin to the engineers who played such a pivotal role in designing the railroads, or in modern times made the smartphone possible. This means a more important role for developer advocates who, at organizations such as Google, are spending a lot more time with customers. These are the subject matter experts helping developers build out their platforms. They are gathering data to develop feedback loops that flow back into open source communities for ongoing development.

On this newest episode of The New Stack Makers podcast, TNS founder Alex Williams sat down with Google Program Manager of Developer Relations Kim Bannerman to discuss her role, and how working in the cloud continues to shape the way today’s organizations are doing business.

In her interview, Bannerman noted that while many companies have already completed a migration over to the cloud, some have not yet done so, and platforms such as Cloud Foundry are helping them to bridge that gap.

“So often, even now we’ve got systems folks on one side of the fence, and developers on another side of the fence, and it was always, ‘their problem’ and they were never really involved,” Bannerman said. “We spend so much time arguing about what level of abstraction our customers should focus on, but so many of them are just trying to get to the cloud still. That’s why I think Cloud Foundry is a good place for that.”

In This Edition:

1:00: Highlighting Kim Bannerman’s role at Google.
4:09: What brought Bannerman to the Cloud Foundry Summit.
7:08: How to delineate between Kubernetes and Cloud Foundry.
10:22: How is Google changing from an enterprise perspective and a cloud-native perspective.
14:31: Why foundation participation benefits Google’s customers
16:37: Taking customer feedback on products back to foundations and open source companies to continue its progress and build them out into products.

The Cloud Foundry Foundation sponsored this podcast. Google is a sponsor of The New Stack.

The post The Evolving Developer Advocate Role — A Conversation with Google’s Kim Bannerman appeared first on The New Stack.

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jonwreed
18 hours ago
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developer advocates via the Google view
Northampton, MA
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We're building a dystopia just to make people click on ads | Zeynep Tufekci

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From: tedtalksdirector
Duration: 22:56

We're building an artificial intelligence-powered dystopia, one click at a time, says technosociologist Zeynep Tufecki. In an eye-opening talk, she details how the same algorithms companies like Facebook, Google and Amazon use to get you to click on ads are also used to organize your access to political and social information. And the machines aren't even the real threat. What we need to understand is how the powerful might use AI to control us -- and what we can do in response.

Check out more TED Talks: http://www.ted.com

The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and more.

Follow TED on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/TEDTalks
Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED

Subscribe to our channel: https://www.youtube.com/TED

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jonwreed
1 day ago
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sounds like my kind of upbeat story....
Northampton, MA
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How we'll earn money in a future without jobs | Martin Ford

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From: tedtalksdirector
Duration: 14:38

Machines that can think, learn and adapt are coming -- and that could mean that we humans will end up with significant unemployment. What should we do about it? In a straightforward talk about a controversial idea, futurist Martin Ford makes the case for separating income from traditional work and instituting a universal basic income.

Check out more TED Talks: http://www.ted.com

The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and more.

Follow TED on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/TEDTalks
Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED

Subscribe to our channel: https://www.youtube.com/TED

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jonwreed
3 days ago
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let's check this one
Northampton, MA
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An hour with Ev Williams: founder of Medium, Twitter, and Blogger

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As I say at the start of our interview, Ev has founded an almost unreasonably long list of companies - and the three listed above each had huge impacts on the Internet, and on digital culture.

A remarkably coherent theme connects these companies - as well as a fourth one, which didn’t really get off the ground. Each has brought people a global platform for spreading thoughts, opinions and more. Ranging from the succinct and casual chirps of Twitter, to the long-form, Spartan pages of Medium. All are discussed in our conversation, which you can hear by searching “After On” in your favorite podcast app, or by clicking right here:

One of the Internet’s great early promises was the radical democratization of communication through digital tools. And that’s a promise it has largely delivered on, with significant help from Ev’s products. But Ev didn’t come to his life’s work as an idealist with a cogent vision, but rather as an entrepreneur testing out his umpteenth product idea. The one that finally caught on happened to be in this realm. It was blogger.com, which Ev described to me in a prior conversation as “a hunch, which turned into a side project, which turned into the real thing.” 

That Real Thing was - basically - the very phenomenon of blogging. Which Ev’s side project popularized, helped shape, and arguably even named. A few years later, Ev and a new crew of co-founders kind of half stumbled upon Twitter’s revolutionary model as well.

But there was nothing inadvertent about Medium, which had as coherent a founding vision as any startup I’ve known. One it remains intensely loyal to. When he launched it five years ago, Ev described Medium as “a beautiful space for reading or writing - and little else.” Those words still fit. As do idealistic goals that Ev also enunciated on launch day, like creating a more informed citizenry, and increasing depth of understanding.

Folks as prominent as presidents and anonymous as the stranger down the street publish 100,000 posts each week on Medium - virtually all of them far longer and deeper than Twitter’s 140-character blasts (and yes - more than the new 280 character blasts as well). Medium posts appear not on disconnected blogs, but in a networked hive of writing, whose algorithms seek to surface the most personally-relevant articles to its tens of millions of readers.

Like Chris Anderson of TED, who was my guest last week, Ev has spent many hours reflecting on the dire state of discourse online, and how to elevate it. But he’s not running a not-for-profit. Indeed, Medium recently started pursuing a model which could be as huge and disruptive within its domain as Netflix has been to TV and film, or as Uber and Lyft have been to transportation-on-demand. That statement may be surprising, even to careful observers of Medium - and I’m not even sure if Ev himself would make it.

But for now, Medium has a long way to go to deliver on Ev’s goals, and its first half-decade has not been a perfectly smooth ride. The company has shifted its model more than once, and recently went through a significant layoff, which Ev describes as the hardest thing he’s ever intentionally done. But Medium has ample reserves in the bank. It’s nowhere near the brink - and as you’re about to learn, Ev has a decent track record for reviving companies that have actually pitched over the brink, and into the abyss beyond.

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jonwreed
13 days ago
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looks like a fun one
Northampton, MA
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Why jobs of the future won't feel like work | David Lee

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From: tedtalksdirector
Duration: 10:07

We've all heard that robots are going to take our jobs -- but what can we do about it? Innovation expert David Lee says that we should start designing jobs that unlock our hidden talents and passions -- the things we spend our weekends doing -- to keep us relevant in the age of robotics. "Start asking people what problems they're inspired to solve and what talents they want to bring to work," Lee says. "When you invite people to be more, they can amaze us with how much more they can be."

Check out more TED Talks: http://www.ted.com

The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and more.

Follow TED on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/TEDTalks
Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED

Subscribe to our channel: https://www.youtube.com/TED

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jonwreed
14 days ago
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an optimistic take and I hope he's right
Northampton, MA
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The revolutionary power of diverse thought | Elif Shafak

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From: tedtalksdirector
Duration: 21:59

"From populist demagogues, we will learn the indispensability of democracy," says novelist Elif Shafak. "From isolationists, we will learn the need for global solidarity. And from tribalists, we will learn the beauty of cosmopolitanism" A native of Turkey, Shafak has experienced firsthand the devastation that a loss of diversity can bring -- and she knows the revolutionary power of plurality in response to authoritarianism. In this passionate, personal talk, she reminds us that there are no binaries, in politics, emotions and our identities. "One should never, ever remain silent for fear of complexity," Shafak says.

Check out more TED Talks: http://www.ted.com

The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and more.

Follow TED on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/TEDTalks
Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED

Subscribe to our channel: https://www.youtube.com/TED

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jonwreed
22 days ago
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ok I'll check this
Northampton, MA
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