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SPOS #579 - Robert Wynne Says Social Media Is Worthless

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Welcome to episode #579 of Six Pixels Of Separation - The Mirum Podcast

Here it is: Six Pixels Of Separation - The Mirum Podcast - Episode #579 - Host: Mitch Joel. Traditional media is still king. Social media is worthless. Public relations is much better than advertising. This were only three of the crazy statements that arrived in my inbox about Robert Wynne and his book, Straight Talk About Public Relations. The irony of his asking to be on my podcast was not lost on me. In fact, I responded to his request with this: "Why would Robert want to be on my podcast if social media is useless?" So, here we are. A heated debate about marketing, advertising, public relations, social media and what gets attention and generates sales for brands. Robert is the president and founder of Wynne Communications. He is also a contributor to Forbes, where he writes a column on public relations. We got at it in this episode. Enjoy the conversation...

Download the Podcast here: Six Pixels Of Separation - The Mirum Podcast - Episode #579 - Host: Mitch Joel.

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jonwreed
4 days ago
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this should be a dandy...
Northampton, MA
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SPOS #575 - Ryan Holiday Wants Brands To Be Perennial

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Welcome to episode #575 of Six Pixels Of Separation - The Mirum Podcast

Here it is: Six Pixels Of Separation - The Mirum Podcast - Episode #575 - Host: Mitch Joel. He has quickly become one of the most interesting people that I know. Ryan Holiday is a strategist and writer. To me he is really becoming one of the best writers on the state of business and growth that there is. He seems to lead two lives. In one life, he's an astute marketer that has released bestselling books like Trust Me, I'm Lying and Growth Hacker Marketing. In another life (that he seems to running at the same time) he's taking ancient stoic philosophy and making it cool again with his wildly successful bestselling books, Ego Is The Enemy, The Obstacle Is The Way and The Daily Stoic. His book, The Obstacle Is The Way, has been translated into seventeen languages and has a cult following among NFL coaches, world-class athletes, TV personalities, political leaders, and others around the world. Now, he's back with a fascinating new book called, Perennial Seller - The Art of Making And Marketing Work That Lasts. I jumped at the opportunity to discuss this thinking in a world of Snaps, 140 characters, always-on marketing and more. Enjoy the conversation...

Download the Podcast here: Six Pixels Of Separation - The Mirum Podcast - Episode #575 - Host: Mitch Joel.

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jonwreed
34 days ago
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an interesting business thinker for sure
Northampton, MA
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SAP: Microservices Drove the Need for Cloud Foundry

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An exclusively open source perspective of the software industry may sometimes fail to take into account certain, otherwise indisputable, realities. One of them is that SAP is the world’s fourth largest software producer by revenue. It wields tremendous influence among the world’s IT organizations. And only until very recently did SAP perceive open source as — to put it very, very mildly — a competitor.

But an effort has been under way at SAP to investigate one open source platform — Cloud Foundry — well before its official stance on open source technology was famously reversed. As Bernd Krannich, the technical lead for SAP’s cloud platform, told The New Stack’s Alex Williams, his colleagues began investigating Cloud Foundry as early as 2011. According to Krannich, it was VMware, which gave birth to Cloud Foundry, that started the process that brought SAP into the open source fold.

“We figured out the boundary conditions for us to engage into Cloud Foundry were not right at this point in time,” Krannich said. “That situation changed round about 2014, when the Cloud Foundry Foundation was about to be created.”

SAP has its own PaaS platform — one that’s competitive with Cloud Foundry, and which the company maintains is the leader in its space. The company still maintains that its unique, proprietary software portfolio — led today by its HANA in-memory database — is the driving factor toward adopting platforms based around database implementations. Cloud Foundry is one option, and SAP is now open to facilitating options.

Jana Richter, one of SAP’s project leaders, told The New Stack that the open source nature of Cloud Foundry is not the driving factor, but instead makes it easier for the community to adopt mechanisms with which to integrate HANA and other SAP technologies into their platforms. The word SAP’s people use for Cloud Foundry is “value-add.”

What tipped the scales for SAP actually embracing Cloud Foundry, was its customers’ need, and its own departments’ need, for enabling microservices architecture. Krannich told us that, as SAP customers more accurately define for themselves the services they want users to be able to consume, those services evolve into microservices. SaaS applications are then built atop that layer, perhaps on Cloud Foundry, perhaps on SAP’s own PaaS.

Listen now to the entire interview, in this latest edition of The New Stack Makers podcast, recorded at from the Cloud Foundry Summit in Santa Clara.

In This Edition:

1:15: SAP’s initial engagement with Cloud Foundry.
6:15: The role of SAP HANA in Cloud Foundry.
11:38: Exploring HANA as a DBaaS.
6:16: The direction of the SAP Cloud infrastructure and how Cloud Foundry plays a part in that.
19:19: How SAP will be building out its cloud platform and services with Cloud Foundry.
24:51: The meaning of ‘integration’ from a technical standpoint across multiple databases.

 Cloud Foundry and VMware are sponsors of The New Stack.

The post SAP: Microservices Drove the Need for Cloud Foundry appeared first on The New Stack.

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jonwreed
37 days ago
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some Cloud Foundry context from SAP.
Northampton, MA
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Software Defined Talk: Advertising, Antitrust, and Talking to Strangers

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Without advertising, there would be no capitalism, and, if you’re not constantly afraid of the Department of Justice knocking at your door, you’re probably doing it wrong. Those are two wacky theories about advertising and antitrust, at least. With Matt Ray on vacation, Brandon and Coté talk about Tim Wu’s 2016 book “The Attention Merchants and the recent Google European Union antitrust ruling. We also discuss several other books, and how to talk to non-tech people at parties. Surprisingly, no container talk!

This episode features Brandon Whichard, and myself, Coté.

Listen above, or subscribe to get the episode, and check out the full show notes for much more.

Michael Coté is Director of Technical Marketing for Pivotal. Brandon Whichard is a Product Manager for IBM. Matt Ray is a Solutions Architect for Chef Software. The views expressed on the Software Defined Talk podcast do not reflect those of The New Stack nor its sponsors.

The post Software Defined Talk: Advertising, Antitrust, and Talking to Strangers appeared first on The New Stack.

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jonwreed
41 days ago
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this looks interesting
Northampton, MA
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Why Health Care Research Needs Multitenant Orchestration to Save Lives

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We often talk about organizations running hybrid workloads on hybrid platforms using hybrid architectures. And we preach about hybridization as though it’s a voluntary evolutionary step that organizations should take. But we rarely consider the hybrid organization — the user of a platform that is, in and of itself, a conglomerate or an amalgam of various classes of users in differing capacities scattered throughout the planet.

The Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington is, on its face, a single research facility that just happens to claim the largest repository of human health data anywhere in the world. But that repository is by virtue of a unique organizational structure that flips the whole question of hybridization on its ear (assuming that such an organization keeps its ears in the same place). From the perspective of the applications it uses, IHME is a hybrid organization. A few hundred research facilities worldwide, all of whom have some responsibility for gathering health care data, also share it.

Yet the platform itself is actually not the cloud. In fact, it’s a centralized data center, on the grounds of the University. Its use of Univa’s Navops, a multitenant adaptation of the open source Kubernetes container orchestration engine, enables all these facilities to use the centralized platform as though it were the cloud. It ensures that UW’s IT team manages governance and security, which many countries in which its users reside require.

But this special edition of The New Stack Makers podcast is not just about abstract infrastructure and multitenancy. This is a use case whose results lead to insights about the way countries and cultures can better treat their own people — helping them avoid death and improve their quality of life. In a world where good health care often stands precariously perched on the precipice, the sharing of information could become a lifeline for tens of thousands.

Listen now to this story of Navops, the IHME, and the real reason we work with infrastructure and automation every day.

Topics:

3:57: How IHME improves citizen health via creating a health database.
7:22: Exploring what types of applications are necessary for IHME and its partners to make sense of that data.
11:00: How Univa’s NavOps and Kubernetes helped IHME’s partners manage their infrastructure.
23:49: Academic workloads and policy as it applies to academic and research workload versus a commercial workload.
29:45: How IHME came to embrace NavOps specifically and apply its scheduling techniques to those purposes.
36:57: Projecting IHME’s resource consumption needs, scheduling, and infrastructure management needs three years from now with NavOps.

Univa is a sponsor of The New Stack.

Feature image: A kindergarten in rural China from a UNICEF video made public through UNICEF.

The post Why Health Care Research Needs Multitenant Orchestration to Save Lives appeared first on The New Stack.

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jonwreed
43 days ago
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interesting
Northampton, MA
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SPOS #573 - The Realities Of Finding Your Passion With Corey Poirier

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Welcome to episode #573 of Six Pixels Of Separation - The Mirum Podcast

Here it is: Six Pixels Of Separation - The Mirum Podcast - Episode #573 - Host: Mitch Joel. I'm not sure that I have ever met someone who has had as many conversations and interviews as I have. I'm not sure that I have ever met someone who has had this many conversations with successful work individuals to figure out what makes them tick. This is the primary project that Corey Poirier is working on. His show, Conversations With Passion! and The Passion Cure features insights from the some of the world's most renown and sought after thinkers and doers. Over 3500 conversations later, and Corey's goal is to help entrepreneurs, business leaders, small business owners improve their life and/or business. He believes that finding your passion is the key (I am somewhat skeptical that passion is the answer). Corey is also a professional speaker and author. Enjoy the conversation...

Download the Podcast here: Six Pixels Of Separation - The Mirum Podcast - Episode #573 - Host: Mitch Joel.

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jonwreed
47 days ago
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career growth special
Northampton, MA
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